The Basics

Basic Elements

Basic Elements

The Stack and Tilt® swing at it’s most basic level can be broken down into just a few elements. In fact if we had to describe the swing in only 10 words these would be them. We sometimes refer to these basic elements as the differentiators as they are the elements that separate a good swing from bad. When golfers have problems, we add detail to these basics as they are needed. One does not have to institute all of the elements of the Stack and Tilt system to at once benefit from them.

Weight Forward

Weight Forward

We prescribe the weight forward on the setup. We use 55-45 as a baseline. On the backswing we prescribe the weight stay on the front and begin moving more to the left as the golfer nears the end of the backswing. The weight being 60-40 left at the end of the backswing would be the baseline. On the downswing the weight continues to move evenly to the left such that it is 90-10 on the left at impact. By the time the right arm is parallel to the ground on the follow through the weight is 95-5 left.

Shoulder Down

Shoulder Down

The trajectory of the left shoulder on the backswing effects stability of the head and center of the shoulder turn. The left shoulder going downward on the backswing and not moving inward keeps your head still. This is a key move in the swing we teach. Not only keeping the weight forward at set-up helps hit the ball first, but keeping your head stable is another necessary part of hitting the ball first. Keeping the head stable allows for the club and hands to orbit the body in a circle.

Hands In

Hands In

Golf is played on a tilted angle. That angle transcribed on the ground is an arc. We want the hands to trace the arc transcribed on the ground, not straight back. The path we prescribe would pass through the base to the middle of the bicep.

Straighten Leg

Straighten Leg

The knee flex in the golf swing changes.  This is true on the backswing and on the downswing and follow-through.  On the backswing, we recommend that the left knee flexes and the right knee straightens.  On the downswing, the knees go back to their original flex.  After impact, the left knee straightens.

Arms Straight

Arms Straight

Masses of golfers flex the arms too much on the backswing, but more importantly at impact and to the finish. Having a clear understanding of when the left arm bends is instrumental in developing consistent contact and ball speed.

Tuck Hips

Tuck Hips

The tucking of the hips or extending of the spine has eluded golf instruction, but has been demonstrated by all games greatest players. The definition of how this works is complex, but it can be demonstrated rather simply, To demonstrate this concept we tell our students that the belt level should be higher from the ground on the finish than the setup. We also tell that the hips should be fully tucked under the torso. For simplicity, raise the belt and tuck the hips.

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